Category Archives: Mostly Technology

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BYOD: Does anyone have a right to WiFi in a school setting?

Free speech. Freedom of religion. Freedom to bear arms. Free access to your school’s WiFi network. We hold these truths to be self-evident. Until the tech department changes the passwords, that is. At my school, students had grown used to a very generous Bring Your Own Device atmosphere that had built up over several years. I suppose most students had their phones on the school Read More →

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Assessment of learning with blogs and portfolios: proof of learning beyond the test

On a previous post here at SEE, Aaron Bieniek posted a great series of questions: “How do you know if the work you are seeing on the blogs actually reflects what that student knows? How do you know the ideas expressed there are not borrowed from someone else? The implication is that unless a student works alone in a controlled “testing” environment – we can’t Read More →

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Student Blog Smackdown

  SMACKDOWN: a confrontation between rivals or competitors I try not to take sides in student disputes, which is why I’ll let you, dear reader, help sort out this situation: Two of my best student bloggers have started getting scrappy with each other in class about how many blog views they have. These students have been with me for a couple years now and both Read More →

A 3rd Blogoversary post

Three years ago, a blogging n00b started writing about a few random ideas regarding his science classes. Yep, that’d be me. I’d like to think that I’ve improved my teaching during those three years. I’ve certainly changed how my class operates, for better or worse. My top five most-viewed posts give a pretty good idea of what has changed about my classroom over the last Read More →

Some science process standards in BH

My nomination for best educational web tool: BlueHarvestFeedback

I normally would automatically vote for Edmodo in a “best-of” web tools list, or maybe Prezi or Evernote, but lots of other people have written about these, and they have become uber-popular the last year or so and most educators have at least heard of them. Chances are that you use them, or at least have tried them once or twice. My vote for a much more Read More →

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iPads in Science Education: Apps Students Actually Use

Almost every tech blogger I run across publishes some sort of Top Ten list of iOS apps at some point in their blog. Not to be outdone, I present my own list here, but whether it has ten apps and whether it manages to sell stuff to anyone remains to be seen. With any luck this post will let you see how we’re using iPads Read More →

Ludwig kids

Standards-Based Grading in the land of portfolios, blogs, and other time-sucking grumkins: a how-to guide

This post is an update to my older year end wrap up that seems to get a lot of traffic from people searching for “standards-based grades” and similar terms. I can only assume that there are lots of folks out there trying to get their heads around what SBG is about and how to do it. What follows will be a (hopefully) concise discussion of Read More →

THIS is why I love digital portfolios: what do my classes look like?

I’ve been asked a few questions lately about what my classes look like: Are your classes “flipped?” What kind of assignments do you give? How much lecturing do you do? I thought about writing a post answering these, but then today I was evaluating this portfolio and thought that I would just post a link to it instead. If you spend some time with this Read More →

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Why I abandoned my AppleTV for Airserver

In which an Apple fan chooses a cheaper alternative for sharing iPad screens. Simply put, there are times that I need to show content-related stuff to my class so we can engage material as a group. Call it lecture, call it discussion, call it whatever you like. When I first started teaching, that consisted of a chalkboard and my lame drawing skills. These days I’m Read More →

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3rd Q recap: why I’ll keep using ePortfolios

I’ve had three chances now to assess my students’ eportfolios for letter grades, and I love ’em. Portfolios and students, that is, not grades. Yes, my school still requires letter grades each quarter, but I hope that someday these sorts of learning portfolios that we are building can be shared without having to be cheapened by labeling them with a simple letter rating. A good Read More →

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