Category Archives: Blogging

passingnotes

Assessment of learning with blogs and portfolios: proof of learning beyond the test

On a previous post here at SEE, Aaron Bieniek posted a great series of questions: “How do you know if the work you are seeing on the blogs actually reflects what that student knows? How do you know the ideas expressed there are not borrowed from someone else? The implication is that unless a student works alone in a controlled “testing” environment – we can’t Read More →

Boxing match

Student Blog Smackdown

  SMACKDOWN: a confrontation between rivals or competitors I try not to take sides in student disputes, which is why I’ll let you, dear reader, help sort out this situation: Two of my best student bloggers have started getting scrappy with each other in class about how many blog views they have. These students have been with me for a couple years now and both Read More →

A 3rd Blogoversary post

Three years ago, a blogging n00b started writing about a few random ideas regarding his science classes. Yep, that’d be me. I’d like to think that I’ve improved my teaching during those three years. I’ve certainly changed how my class operates, for better or worse. My top five most-viewed posts give a pretty good idea of what has changed about my classroom over the last Read More →

Ludwig kids

Standards-Based Grading in the land of portfolios, blogs, and other time-sucking grumkins: a how-to guide

This post is an update to my older year end wrap up that seems to get a lot of traffic from people searching for “standards-based grades” and similar terms. I can only assume that there are lots of folks out there trying to get their heads around what SBG is about and how to do it. What follows will be a (hopefully) concise discussion of Read More →

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3rd Q recap: why I’ll keep using ePortfolios

I’ve had three chances now to assess my students’ eportfolios for letter grades, and I love ’em. Portfolios and students, that is, not grades. Yes, my school still requires letter grades each quarter, but I hope that someday these sorts of learning portfolios that we are building can be shared without having to be cheapened by labeling them with a simple letter rating. A good Read More →

Student ePortfolios in the High School Science Classroom: Q & A

Q: What’s an ePortfolio? A: Let me start by saying that, like most of what I use in my teaching, I didn’t invent ePortfolios and I can’t answer for everyone since ePortfolios mean different things to different people. But I will define an ePortfolio as an online space that gets used to collect and showcase evidence of individual student learning. Q: You mean its like Read More →

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Managing student websites with Pearltrees

This is just a quick post to share a neat tool for keeping track of student websites called Pearltrees. I ran across this article recently and thought this might be useful for organizing all of my student sites that I need to keep track of. As I’ve mentioned before on this blog, I keep track of individual student blogs using RSS feeds. But there are Read More →

How I manage lots of students’ blogs: RSS feeds and Google Reader

This was written a while ago for a fellow teacher over at Classroom 2.0 but I thought I’d repost it here because I’m not sure it’s public in its original form and some folks have been asking about managing student blogs: ________ Thanks for the kind comments about my blog! I’m glad its given you some ideas to try. Forgive me if you know some Read More →

Blogs, portfolios, and feedback (oh my!)

This is a work in progress, as most of my stuff is, but here is my Assessment Philosophy for the 2011-2012 school year that I’ll be sharing with students and their parents. Some key new features I’m trying: student blog posts will receive only feedback, not grades the spreadsheets I used last year will be editable by both myself and the student for each to Read More →

studentblogsinreader

Blogging in the Science Classroom: The Worksheet is Dead

One of the major changes that I made this year was to switch to using individual student blogs as the centerpiece of student assessment (the other major change was to implement standards-based grading). I started using student blogs for a number of reasons including: I was tired of grading worksheets with the same copied answers on them. I realized that these worksheets weren’t always helpful Read More →

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